Managing Safety Performance News

Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 6

The people running operations – making the product, delivering the service, handling the materials – really are world class when it comes to measuring how well their business is performing. They’re all over all the important details of how much, how well, how often.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 7

The management team has gathered around the conference table in an emergency meeting. The urgent topic: what to do to stanch the rising tide of accidents and injuries?

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 8

In his years of working with industrial clients, Deming built what many of us in the manufacturing management business would learn as his “14 Absolutes of Quality.” In the middle of his list of Absolutes was the proviso to “Drive out fear”, fear of getting in trouble for making defective products and reporting quality problems was a major roadblock to progress.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 9

Good questions can do the heavy lifting for managers. A question starts by getting someone else talking. For all of the sophisticated theories that have been offered about the art of interpersonal communication, doesn’t communication fundamentally boil down to someone speaking, and others listening to what is being said?

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 10

Of all new assignments we encounter in the course of our career, no one is bigger than the change from managing yourself to managing others. When our new assignment and responsibilities were described, we were reminded “you are also accountable for the safety of those assigned to you.”

Read More »

Popular Topics

Popular Articles

Ever Vigilant

Recognizing what can hurt you is a constant and never-ending process. No matter who you are, where you are, or what you happen to be doing, you need to be on the lookout for what can hurt you.

Read More »

Earbud Nation

This month Paul examines lessons learned from a highway construction fatality where earbuds were involved. The discussion is central to understanding hazards and risk both personally and for those you work with. This may be the most important newsletter that Paul has written and he has written a lot of good ones.

Read More »

Fatal Assumptions

Making assumptions may make work and life easier, but it does not make life and work safer. In fact, it often works in exactly the opposite way.

Read More »

Work Done Here

This month Paul examines lessons learned from improvised tools and work methods where the odds of a hazard are a lot higher and there is a potential for creative problem solvers to be taking too much risk.

Read More »

Improvisation

Sometimes solutions are the stuff of genius. But not every one of those solutions turns out to be great – or safe. Here’s just such a case. 

Read More »

Go – or Stop?

This month in Go —or Stop? Paul examines lessons learned from another first day on the job in industry. This one went totally different than my first day but also made a lasting impression and offers some very important lessons not to be soon forgotten.

Read More »

Asking “Should?”

Brand new to the world of industry, it’s your first day on the job. You’ve been given your first assignment: a seemingly simple clean up task. Having been given no training, getting ready to start…

Read More »

Managing Risk: The Right Stuff

This month in Managing Risk: The Right Stuff Paul examines lessons learned about managing risk in the space program. He provides four very important lessons that need to be understood about risk and sending people, to the moon and/or home alive and well at the end of each and every day.

Read More »

Factoring In The Human

Imagine your momentary queasiness as you start reading…US Airways 1549. You immediately know what that is about and have a pretty good idea Captain Sully has something to do with it. This month Paul examines the human factor when things go bump in the night…or the Hudson River.

Read More »
Scroll to Top