Top 10 Mistakes

Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 1

Managing safety performance– sending everyone home safe at the end of the day – is fundamentally a game of execution. No matter how good the game plan – policies, procedures and programs – when it comes to bottom line safety performance, the game is won or lost on the field.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 2

Read the mission, vision and values statement of just about any industrial company these days, and you’re bound to find safety prominently mentioned. Words to the effect that “The safety of our stakeholders is of critical importance to the success of our business” can be found right next to the other goals and values so important

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 3

It’s a scene that every one in operations and those of us who have ever managed operations knows all too well.

We’ve gathered up the entire department for an important safety meeting – important because we’re rolling out a new company safety policy.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 4

When we were kids growing up in school, we all knew who the leaders were. They were the ones who were the best athletes, had the best personalities, and yes, were the best looking. Everybody – us included – followed them. They made leading look easy – and cool.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 5

Sooner or later anyone who’s ever golfed as fallen to the temptation: buy the latest club to hit the market. The one guaranteed to knock strokes off next Saturday’s round.

Every once in a while, the latest technology works like magic. At least for a few rounds, and then we revert to form.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 6

The people running operations – making the product, delivering the service, handling the materials – really are world class when it comes to measuring how well their business is performing. They’re all over all the important details of how much, how well, how often.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 7

The management team has gathered around the conference table in an emergency meeting. The urgent topic: what to do to stanch the rising tide of accidents and injuries?

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 8

In his years of working with industrial clients, Deming built what many of us in the manufacturing management business would learn as his “14 Absolutes of Quality.” In the middle of his list of Absolutes was the proviso to “Drive out fear”, fear of getting in trouble for making defective products and reporting quality problems was a major roadblock to progress.

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 9

Good questions can do the heavy lifting for managers. A question starts by getting someone else talking. For all of the sophisticated theories that have been offered about the art of interpersonal communication, doesn’t communication fundamentally boil down to someone speaking, and others listening to what is being said?

Read More »
Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 10

Of all new assignments we encounter in the course of our career, no one is bigger than the change from managing yourself to managing others. When our new assignment and responsibilities were described, we were reminded “you are also accountable for the safety of those assigned to you.”

Read More »

Popular Topics

Popular Articles

Comparing Hazards

This month Paul looks at how we perceive the relative risk of hazards, as well as the process we use to determine which ones require the most attention.

Read More »

Your Legacy

This month Paul asks “What would you like your legacy to be?” You might be tempted to think this is just life advice and has little to do with what you do at work. You would be wrong. Paul holds up the legacy of one of the great leaders he met during his career who left a lasting impression on Paul. The lessons are important if you want to make a difference sending people home alive and well at the end of each and every day.

Read More »

Saying Something

It’s a rule anyone who’s ever learned to change a tire knows well: before jacking up a vehicle, put it in park and set the parking brake. For good measure, chock the wheels…

Read More »

Regarding Trust

This month Paul disects three similar events to examine the issue of trust. You might be surprised how he ties it all together. He provides us some very important thoughts that we all need to understand.

Read More »

Trust

A few weeks ago a residential condo collapsed, catastrophically and tragically – but absolutely not unexpectedly. If you have followed the story, you know there were plenty of warnings…

Read More »

A Behavior Problem

This month Paul begins with a story from the other side of the coin, noncompliance and unsafe practices. He examines the rewards and risks of taking shortcuts. Certainly, there are rewards and consequences, both good and bad, for every behavior. Paul sheds light on them in order to help you send people home alive and well at the end of the day.

Read More »

On Followership

This month Paul analyzes followers and the underrecognized and underappreciated power in followership. Not those followers that followed their leaders into to conflict rather those working in an industrial operation, like yours. Along with examining the leadership mandate Paul explores leaders as followers. In the end it is the critical role followers play in execution, business performance and sending people home alive and well at the end of each and every day that gets Paul’s attention. If, after reading what Paul wrote, you feel compelled to go wildly dance on a hill… well, maybe I’ll see you there…

Read More »

Second Thoughts

You’re in a rush. There’s a delivery about to show up and your crew has equipment to be repositioned to prepare for the arrival.
 
In the middle of all of that, you have a safety concern…

Read More »

A Crucial Conversation

This month Paul analyzes A Crucial Conversation, one particular real-world conversation, to understand the dynamics in play, especially those crucial to sending people home alive and well. He does a deep dive into the organization power present in such conversations. If more leaders understood that power, we might never have heard of the events of April 20th 2010.

Read More »
en_USEnglish
Scroll to Top