Managing Safety Performance News

Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 7

The management team has gathered around the conference table in an emergency meeting. The urgent topic: what to do to stanch the rising tide of accidents and injuries?

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Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 8

In his years of working with industrial clients, Deming built what many of us in the manufacturing management business would learn as his “14 Absolutes of Quality.” In the middle of his list of Absolutes was the proviso to “Drive out fear”, fear of getting in trouble for making defective products and reporting quality problems was a major roadblock to progress.

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Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 9

Good questions can do the heavy lifting for managers. A question starts by getting someone else talking. For all of the sophisticated theories that have been offered about the art of interpersonal communication, doesn’t communication fundamentally boil down to someone speaking, and others listening to what is being said?

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Top 10 Mistakes

Biggest Mistake Number 10

Of all new assignments we encounter in the course of our career, no one is bigger than the change from managing yourself to managing others. When our new assignment and responsibilities were described, we were reminded “you are also accountable for the safety of those assigned to you.”

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Popular Articles

Stop Everything!

This month Paul explores another lesson to be learned about stopping the job and the decisions-maker’s choice. There are lessons about taking action or choosing not to that can be useful sending people home alive and well at the end of each and every day.

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Precaution!

On the subject of the Coronavirus: yes, or no, are you taking precautions? Have you seen others taking the kind of precautions they would not normally take?

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A Deadly Serious Hazard

This month Paul discusses that the risks that scare us and the risks that kill us are different. He examines the lessons to be learned from the Coronavirus and how those lessons can help leaders like you send people home alive and well at the end of each and every day.

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What Now?

This month Paul examines the customary beginning of a new year thinking about goals and results. He reminded me of Jim, only Paul’s search is for ’cause’ around the leading and lagging indicators used to measure safety performance. Anyone who knows Paul knows he tends to have a different and insightful perspective. He truly is a Rebel With a Cause — to help leaders like you send people home alive and well at the end of each and every day.

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A Close Call!

Near-miss. Near-hit. Close call. Call it whatever you want: something happened; it wasn’t good; fortunately, nobody got hurt.

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Your Gift

This month Paul, during this season of giving, examines lessons learned from the past that might suggest the best gifts you can give if your goal is sending your followers home alive and well at the end of the day. It really got me thinking and I think it will for you as well.

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Working Alone

In this edition Paul poses some important questions anyone who ever works alone needs to ask – and answer – for themselves.

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A Simple Job

This month Paul examines lessons learned from a fatality doing a “Simple” clean-up job at a restaurant. The discussion is central to understanding how we perceive hazards and take risks. He provides some very interesting insight into the things that can get someone hurt, hurt seriously, or worse.

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Ever Vigilant

Recognizing what can hurt you is a constant and never-ending process. No matter who you are, where you are, or what you happen to be doing, you need to be on the lookout for what can hurt you.

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